Letter from Andros : the Aegean Arts Circle Writing Workshop 2017

Again this year,  I had the great good fortune to lead the Creative Writing Workshop organized on the Cycladic island of Andros by the Aegean Arts Circle founded by artist and writer Amalia Melis. This year marked the fifteenth anniversary of the summer workshop, first held in 2002. Given the climate of uncertainty pervading so many cultural endeavors and institutions in these times of economic crisis, it is remarkable that the Aegean Arts Circle has continued to thrive, and attract writers from all over Europe and the US.   Past instructors include Dorothy Allison, Thomas E Kennedy, David Lazar, and Robert Owen Butler.

Half of the workshoppers were “returnees” coming back to a setting they loved in order to move forward with projects  — one participant  had even been present at the very first workshop  back in 2002. Others instead were newcomers and some had never been to Greece before.

Our group of gifted writers included a professional British journalist working on her first novel, in the dystopic vein.  We also had a professor of philosophy from a prestigious US college working on a memoir about his teaching experiences in an exciting experimental school, an inspirational blogger writing hilariously about her life as a pet sitter, a diplomat writing an autobiographical novel that hinges on a search for mysterious origins, a poet with a background in science who started her first novel at the workshop, a survivor interned during the Second World War, writing  of her childhood in the camp, the daughter of a sea-going family of many generations writing about her love affair with boats, a Greek-English writer working on a multivoiced novel entwining two generations of islanders, and Greek American writer working on a second novel, set in Greece.

As usual we were hosted by the Andros Holiday Hotel, a magnificent structure with spacious, air conditioned rooms and huge private terraces overlooking the water, wifi,  salt water pool,  private beach, and  a first rate chef who prepared luscious traditional Greek meals accompanied by lots of salads, vegetables, and fine local wine.

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Andros Holiday Hotel

 

 

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View from the Dining Terrace

During class time, we critiqued two manuscripts per session  submitted prior to the workshop,  did free writes,  and shared writing exercises done as homework.   The focus for the workshop was “World Building”  in the larger sense – how we translate, transform and reconstruct the world around us in our writing.  We took some inspiration from Virginia Woolf’s essays  “Life and the Novelist” and  “A Sketch of the Past,” to examine our own writing process.  From where do  our new ideas , stories,  characters and imagery come?   We also took a few tips from T.S. Eliot’s essay on the Metaphysical Poets to enquire into how our minds select random details from our experience and reassemble them in meaningful ways.

moments of being
A Sketch of the Past in Moments of Being provided inspiration

We  began by scrutinizing our immediate environment  and recent experiences to find  imagery or stories  we might otherwise have overlooked, calling all the senses into play. Woolf says that although writers “can no more cease to receive impressions than a fish in mid-ocean can cease to let the water rush through his gills,” they must learn to master their sensibility and make it serve their purposes.  Our first day, we discussed the ways the creative impulse first manifests when we start writing a new piece – for some it begins with one or more characters suddenly  piping up in the mind’s ear. For others places and settings generate stories and characters.  Others found that intensely personal stories worked themselves out through  imaginary characters and plots in exotic settings.  For yet others, a striking image set a story in motion.

CHARACTER was another area of intense investigation.  We looked at Woolf’s  idea in “Mr. Bennett and Mrs Brown” on the challenge of rendering a complete character

and experimented with Margo Livesey’s recipe for creating characters in which bad characters must have good points and good characters have flaws.  We also looked at some ideas from Donald Maas’  book   Writing 21st Century Fiction: High Impact  Techniques for Exceptional Storytelling  https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/14523534-writing-21st-century-fiction

PLACE was another major topic.  “Fiction depends for its life on place. Location is the crossroads  of circumstance, the proving ground of What happened, Who’s here? Who’s coming? And that is the heart’s field”  writes Eudora Welty.  We discussed the ways places can express emotion, manifest consciousness, or become a character as Lawrence Durrell suggests.

 

Early on in the workshop, we remarked how so many of the stories we were telling hinged on the Quest Motif and we explored the ways that pattern fit our projects.  POINT OF VIEW , PLOT STRUCTURES, DUAL TIMELINES, and BACKSTORY were key issues.

Workshop events included group gourmet dinners attended also by local writers and friends of the Workshop, private readings in the evening from work-in-progress,  a public reading  at which I read from Signatures in Stone: A Bomarzo Mystery, winner of the 2013 Daphne Du Maurier Award, and a public showing of 2 video shorts by Sergio Baldassarre – The Professor’s Teeth  and  his newest SF fairy tale,  The Cosmic Omelette.

It was sad to leave our island. After nine nights and eight days of intense work, we had formed a real community and we all had made headway on the projects we had come with.

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This year’s writers

TWO EXERCISES FROM THIS YEAR’S WORKSHOP

From Homer’s catalogue of ships in the Iliad, to James Joyce’s inventory of the objects in Bloom’s drawer in Ulysses, lists are tools for world building. List-making also can be a  dynamic generative exercise  when exploring characters or settings.   Novelist and critic Umberto Eco has praised lists as the origin of culture, for they impose order on chaos; we love lists, he claims, because we don’t want to die.

MAKE A LIST –   fiction writers :  choose a character and make a list, using the ideas below for inspiration.   Memoir writers, focus on a setting or episode and make a list related to it.

contents of a drawer, medicine chest, kitchen cupboard,  pocket, purse, tool kit, mess kit, trunk

shopping list

articles of clothing for a special occasion

keys

failures

mistakes, lovers, enemies,

births, deaths, illnesses

celebrations

Free Write:  The Keys to the Kingdom     Free associate.  What does this expression mean to you?

More Exercises may be found in The Soul of Place A Creative Writing Workshop: Ideas and Exercises for Conjuring the Genius Loci  which provided ideas for other workshop activities.

Goodbye  Andros,  hope to see you again next year!  Linda Lappin

Greece Cruise ship
Kalo Taxithi!
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